Invited Speakers

Keynote Speakers

Sabyasachi Mukherjee is Director General of Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS), the principal museum of Mumbai, India. He is also Director of the Postgraduate (Diploma) Programme in Museology and Art Conservation at CSMVS Institute, University of Mumbai. Under Sabyasachi’s leadership the museum has undergone extensive modernisation, including the refurbishment of its main building and the establishment of a conservation centre, new galleries and educational initiatives. In recognition of these initiatives, UNESCO awarded the museum the 2010 Asia-Pacific Heritage Award for Cultural Heritage Conservation. Sabyasachi has organised numerous exhibitions and tours and overseen publications, conservation projects, exchange programmes and archive projects in partnership with museums worldwide. He received the Special Jury Mention Award 2016–17 from the Bombay Management Association in recognition of his outstanding contribution towards the preservation of Indian culture and enhancing the glory of the museum. Sabyasachi recently received the degree of Doctor ‘honoris causa’ from the University of Edinburgh for transformation of CSMVS to a vibrant, engaged, cultural catalyst in Mumbai.

 

Armando Perla is a Project Manager at the new Swedish Museum of Movements, currently in development in the city of Malmo Sweden, a museum focused on the issues of migration and democracy nationally and internationally. He was part of the founding team of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, where he worked as a curator of Canadian and international human rights law for 9 years. Armando is also a board member of the ICOM International Committee on Ethical Dilemmas. In collaboration with community organisations, academia and the museum sector, he is currently developing a set of ethical guidelines for museum professionals working with stories of historically marginalised populations. Through his curatorial career Armando has worked in the development of numerous exhibitions in Canada and abroad. He has vast experiences as a researcher as well as in conducting oral histories and co-curating exhibitions with vulnerable and historically marginalised populations. Armando has been and Adjunct Professor at the University of Winnipeg and at the faculty of law at the University of Manitoba in Canada. He has also worked in different capacities in various human rights and academic organisations such as Casa Alianza in Guatemala, Lund University Commissioned Education in Sweden, the Manitoba Interfaith Immigration Council in Canada and the Center for Justice and International Law in Washington DC. Armando holds a Law Degree from L’Université Laval in Canada and a Master of Laws in International Human Rights Law from Lund University and the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law in Sweden.

Sponsored by: 

 

Rhana Devenport ONZM is the Director of the Art Gallery of South Australia and the first woman to hold this position. She is a museum director, curator, editor, and cultural producer whose career spans art museums, biennials and arts festivals.  As former Director of Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki she, in 2017, curated the work of Lisa Reihana for the New Zealand Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Prior to that she was Director of the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery in New Plymouth, leading to the development of the Len Lye Centre. In Australia she worked on the first four APTs at QAGOMA. Her curatorial interests include contemporary art of Asia and the Pacific, time-based media and social practice.

 

 

Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer from the Australian National University. She is an internationally recognised expert on Australian climate variability and change, and author of Sunburnt Country: The future and history of climate change in Australia. Joëlle is currently serving as a lead author for the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Sixth Assessment Report due for release in 2021. She is also a councillor of the Climate Council, Australia’s leading independent body providing expert advice to the Australian public on climate change and policy.

 

 

 

Climate Change and the Cultural Sector Panel speakers

Jenny Newell is the Manager of Climate Change Projects at the Australian Museum. She works on the cultural dimensions of climate change, focusing on communities in Australia and the Pacific, as well as contributing to international networks of museums engaging with climate change. With a background in Pacific and Environmental History, Newell has held curatorial roles at the British Museum, National Museum of Australia, and American Museum of Natural History (New York). At the Australian Museum since 2016, Newell has developed programs around climate change in Sydney, chairs the Australian Museum’s Climate Change Working Party, is a member of the ICOM Working Party for Sustainability and convenes the (independent) Museums & Climate Change Network. She co-edited Curating the Future: Museums, Communities and Climate Change (Routledge) and Living with the Anthropocene: Love, Loss & Hope in the Face of Environmental Crisis (NewSouth, forthcoming).

 

Guy Abrahams is Co-founder of CLIMARTE, and Director of the ART + ENVIRONMENT consultancy. Guy was a lawyer before becoming Director of Christine Abrahams Gallery (1987 – 2008). He is an Associate of the University of Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute and a valuer for the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program.

Past Board positions include City of Melbourne Art & Heritage Collection Advisory Panel (Chair), City of Melbourne Public Art Advisory Panel, Australian Tapestry Workshop, Banksia Environmental Foundation, Jewish Museum of Australia Visual Arts Committee,
Australian Commercial Galleries Association (President), National Gallery of Victoria Art Foundation, and the Melbourne Art Fair.

Guy holds a Master of Environment in climate change politics & policy, as well as law and arts degrees. In 2009 he received climate communications training from US Vice President Al Gore. Guy is currently involved in multiple campaigns advocating for urgent action on climate change, including through the arts, as a shareholder activist, and as a citizen of this crazy world.

 

Libby Robin is an environmental historian and curator-at-large, who has worked at the National Museum of Australia, Canberra and with museums in Copenhagen, Edinburgh, Munich and New York. She was advisor to the environmental history team at the National Museum of Estonia, Tartu in 2014, and an invited lecturer in an intensive museums graduate course in Stavanger, Norway in 2019. She is Emeritus Professor, Fenner School of Environment and Society at the Australian National University, Canberra and Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities (elected 2013).
She holds a doctorate in history and philosophy of science from the University of Melbourne, undergraduate degrees in arts and science and a graduate diploma in education. She is author of over 100 chapters and journal articles in environmental history, museum practice and the history of ecology. Her 16 books include Curating the Future: Museums, Communities and Climate Change (Routledge 2017, edited with Jennifer Newell and Kirsten Wehner) The Environment: A History of the Idea (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018, with Paul Warde and Sverker Sörlin), How a Continent Created a Nation (NSW Premier’s Australian History Prize 2007) and The Flight of the Emu (MUP, Victorian Premier’s Literary Prize 2003). Her new work includes a book-in-progress that considers the role of museums in the Anthropocene.

 

Tony Birch is the inaugural Bruce McGuinness Research Fellow in the Moondani Balluk Academic Centre at Victoria University in Melbourne. His research is concerned with Climate Justice and Protection of Country. He is also a novelist and short fiction writer. In 2017 he was awarded the Patrick White Literary Prize for his contribution to Australian literature.

 

 

 

 

 

Leadership, Transformative Change and the Future of Museums Panel speakers

Marcus Hughes, Head of Indigenous Engagement & Strategy, Museum of the Applied Arts and Sciences (MAAS), NSW.

Marcus has worked within the arts and cultural sector throughout Australia and the UK as a producer, presenter and advocate across all artistic disciplines, contexts and environments. In 2014 he addressed the 6th World Summit on Arts and Culture and was Adjunct Associate Professor at Victoria University’s Moondani Balluk Indigenous Academic Unit. He sits on the Australian Museums and Galleries Association National Council, the National Film and Sound Archive’s Indigenous Connections Committee, and is an Adjunct Associate Professor at Western Sydney University’s School of Humanities & Communication Arts.

 

Courtney Johnston took up the role of Tumu Whakarae | Chief Executive of Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in December 2019.

Raised on a dairy farm in Taranaki, Courtney has lived and worked in Wellington since 2000. She holds a Masters in Art History from Victoria University of Wellington, and was the 2015 recipient of a Winston Churchill Memorial Trust Scholarship to research contemporary museum practice in the United States.

Courtney brings a wealth of experience to the role, spanning museums, digital development, and governance. While completing a Masters in Art History at Victoria University of Wellington, Courtney worked at numerous Wellington art galleries and museums as a visitor host, including at Te Papa just after its opening. She went on to roles at City Gallery Wellington, National Library of New Zealand, and as general manager at web agency Boost New Media. From 2012 to 2018, Courtney was Director of The Dowse Art Museum and Petone Settlers Museum Te Whare Whaakaro o Pito-one.

In September 2018 Courtney re-joined Te Papa as Director Audience and Insight, leading the teams responsible for the museum’s audience-facing work, across physical and digital channels, including oversight of the museum’s exhibitions, public events and digital outreach, alongside audience research, marketing and communications, and Te Papa’s learning programmes.

Courtney is the immediate past chair of Museums Aotearoa, chair of The Pantograph Punch, and a trustee of Arts Wellington and the Wellington Performing Arts Trust. She was the visual arts commentator for RNZ’s Nine to Noon programme from 2010 to 2019. She has also held governance and advisory roles with the National Digital Forum, Tohatoha (Creative Commons Aotearoa New Zealand), Inland Revenue, and MBIE.

 

Armando Perla is a Project Manager at the new Swedish Museum of Movements, currently in development in the city of Malmo Sweden, a museum focused on the issues of migration and democracy nationally and internationally. He was part of the founding team of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, where he worked as a curator of Canadian and international human rights law for 9 years. Armando is also a board member of the ICOM International Committee on Ethical Dilemmas. In collaboration with community organisations, academia and the museum sector, he is currently developing a set of ethical guidelines for museum professionals working with stories of historically marginalised populations. Through his curatorial career Armando has worked in the development of numerous exhibitions in Canada and abroad. He has vast experiences as a researcher as well as in conducting oral histories and co-curating exhibitions with vulnerable and historically marginalised populations. Armando has been and Adjunct Professor at the University of Winnipeg and at the faculty of law at the University of Manitoba in Canada. He has also worked in different capacities in various human rights and academic organisations such as Casa Alianza in Guatemala, Lund University Commissioned Education in Sweden, the Manitoba Interfaith Immigration Council in Canada and the Center for Justice and International Law in Washington DC. Armando holds a Law Degree from L’Université Laval in Canada and a Master of Laws in International Human Rights Law from Lund University and the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law in Sweden.

Sponsored by: 

 

Caroline Bowditch, is proudly the CEO at Arts Access Victoria, the state’s peak body on arts and disability. She returned to Australia after 16 years living, making, performing and touring work in the UK and internationally. She is committed to embedding change, raising the profile of Deaf and Disabled artists and exploring cultural heritage from a disability perspective. Her background is as a performer, maker, facilitator, speaker and she continues to be an agent for change in the arts and cultural space.

 

 

 

 

The Indigenous Roadmap – One Year On speakers

Marcus Hughes, Head of Indigenous Engagement & Strategy, Museum of the Applied Arts and Sciences (MAAS), NSW.

Marcus has worked within the arts and cultural sector throughout Australia and the UK as a producer, presenter and advocate across all artistic disciplines, contexts and environments. In 2014 he addressed the 6th World Summit on Arts and Culture and was Adjunct Associate Professor at Victoria University’s Moondani Balluk Indigenous Academic Unit. He sits on the Australian Museums and Galleries Association National Council, the National Film and Sound Archive’s Indigenous Connections Committee, and is an Adjunct Associate Professor at Western Sydney University’s School of Humanities & Communication Arts.

 

Deanne Fitzgerald is a Yamatji/Nyoongar woman who has been living and working in Perth for the last 30 years. She has a BA Hons in Culture and Heritage and has been working in this area in both government and non-government including the mining sector for a number of years.

Deanne is the Senior Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisor at the Western Australian Museum and has been working at the Museum for 6 years. Her main role is to provide advice to the CEO, Executive and Museum staff regarding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander matters; she has developed the Museum’s Reflect and Innovate RAPs, and continues to support the Museum’s Aboriginal Advisory Committee and the staff of the WA Museum.

Deanne has been co-opted onto the AMaGA National Council to advise and help with the implementation of the Indigenous Roadmap and other aspects of council business and strategy.